Full Stack Software Developer. Any and all opinions are my own. https://aimeeliang.com
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Credits to Pixabay at Pexels.com

Like many of my posts, I came across the term “PWA” by way of job postings. As I mentioned in my NoSQL piece, a lot of coding and software can be intimidating — to both developers and non-developers — given all the acronyms and terminology.

Back to the main topic — it was some time ago that I saw a job posting state that, as a preferred qualification, applicants know how to build a PWA. This led me to think, “What is a PWA?”

To put it simply, a PWA is a Progressive Web Application. MDN defines these as…


“Write pseudocode to perform in-order traversal in a binary tree” (Hackr.io)

First of all, what is a binary tree?

As it turns out, there’s sort of a reason why almost all (99.98%?) of companies searching for software engineers and developers want someone who has a Computer Science background. Although there are debates as to whether these qualifications and indeed, even interviews, are the best way to assess a candidate, Computer Science teaches important concepts that as developers and engineers, you must understand in order to ace that interview.

Note: of course, I can’t speak -or write- on behalf of…


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Thanks to Lukas at Pexel for this stock image!

“Seeking Frontend Developer”, “Hiring backend engineers”, “Software Engineer II”, “Junior Back-end Developer”, “Junior Programmer”

The amount of jobs postings for software engineers/developers/programmers is overwhelming, but job titles can be confusing as well. What makes a developer different from an engineer? Aren’t they the same thing? If you’re an engineer, are you also a programmer? What’s the difference?

  1. “Experience working with a Front End framework such as React/Angular/Vue/Ember”
  2. “Experience with HTML, CSS…”
  3. “Programming knowledge in one or more of these languages…”
  4. “Experience with relational databases such as…”

These are just a few qualifications companies are looking for in candidates — but…


Does it seem like all these computer programming languages, frameworks, and databases have odd names? I know it seemed that way to me. We’ve got JavaScript, Java (no relation), C, C++, C# (pronounced C-sharp), Python, Go (also called Golang), Haskell, PHP, Ruby, React, Vue, Angular, Ember, Express, Laravel, and then this SQL stuff. So, what is SQL?

SQL (pronounced “ess-que-el” or “sequel”) is short for Structured Query Language. Its databases include SQLite, MySQL, PostgresQL, among others. When we build an app, we usually need a database to store user information. Think: usernames, emails, passwords, security questions and corresponding answers…


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Credits to Pixabay

We interact with JavaScript on a daily basis, unless you don’t use the internet, in which case I’m very curious how you came across this blog. If you go to any web page, chances are the pages you see and interact with are built by JavaScript or some framework based on the language. JavaScript operates on the client-side, which is a fancier way of saying it’s what the user sees.

Though the language has been around for maybe a decade, it’s easily the most popular language. Year after year, Stack Overflow’s survey lists JavaScript as its top language, followed closely…


String reversal is a common algorithm challenge and seemingly pretty straightforward. Given a string, you’re asked to find a solution that will return a new string with all characters in reverse order. For example, the string “abc” will return as the reversed string “cba”. This post will go over a few different methods in JavaScript to solve this algorithm, and briefly go over time complexity for each solution.

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The first solution is to use JavaScript’s built-in methods: split, reverse, and join. To clarify, these methods do the following:

  1. Split() separates a string into individual substrings. In the parenthesis, you can…


Glassmorphism is a design trend in 2021, but is it accessible?

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Photo credits to hype4

For my new project, I decided to expand my CSS skills and create a landing page on a web app using HTML and CSS. The catch? I wanted to incorporate glassmorphism. I first became aware of glassmorphism on LinkedIn and YouTube. A quick Google search has designated glassmorphism as the 2021 UI/UX trend. Glassmorphism has its appeal: it’s sleek and minimalist. In fact, UX Collective first published about it in late November 2020.


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Truth be told, I never put much thought on User Experience and User Interface until I started learning React. React is one of many JavaScript libraries, created by Facebook and arguably one of the most popular Frontend frameworks today. An essential part — in my opinion — of starting a React App is wireframing. How does the app look? More importantly, how do we want users to interact with the app? What kind of experience do we want users to have with our app? Intentional wireframing is key to building a good frontend, especially with how React is set up.


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Why might you want to use a forEach callback method over a traditional for loop? What’s the advantages of using reduce to find a sum versus declaring a variable and having each number added to the variable? When I began my coding journey, I wondered these questions but hadn’t given it much thought. Both achieve the same result in the end. What was frustrating was the answer I’d often hear back, “Well, doing X makes your code run a little faster than Y.” That’s when I learned about time complexity. Time complexity is a term in computer science theory that…


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When I started at the Flatiron School, I had never coded Ruby before. I’m embarrassed to admit I also thought Ruby on Rails was the same as Ruby. Spoiler alert: it’s not. Now that I’ve concluded Module 2 of my program, here are a few of my thoughts on this language and framework, as compared to vanilla JavaScript:

  1. Rails is incredibly intuitive.

Prior to Flatiron, I was learning to code alongside Codecademy, Youtube tutorials, FreeCodeCamp, and took a few bootcamp prep courses with Codesmith. I’d never worked with a framework and remember wondering how I would go from writing a…

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